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Monoclonal Antibiotics




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How Do Antibodies Work?

Antibodies are protein molecules that play a crucial role in the immune system. They produced in white blood cells, called B-lymphocytes. These B-lymphocytes each make copies of their own unique antibody. Since there are an enormous amount of B-lymphocytes in the human body, it allows for the production of antibodies against all possible antigens. Antibodies are produced according to the antibody gene version in B-lymphocyte precursor-cells. The reason that millions of different antibodies can be made is because of the extensive rearrangements of antibody genes in B-lymphocyte precursor-cells.

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An antibody works by recognizing and binding to its corresponding antigen on a foreign molecule. Antigens are often found to be proteins, as well as sugars, carried on bacterial and viral surfaces, but might also be distinctive cancer-cell surface proteins. Antigen binding triggers B-cell multiplication and antibody release. When antibodies bind with their corresponding antigens, it activates an immune response. This is how the human immune system recognizes and defends itself against bacteria, viruses, and substances that appear foreign and harmful to the body.